CFP

Call for Book Reviews
Communication Center Journal (CCJ)

CCJ invites book reviews and scholarly reviews of 750-1,000 words. We welcome inquiries and suggestions regarding potential books to review or titles of particular interest. Thorough reviews will usually include the following:

  • A brief description of the book’s contents.
  • A scholarly evaluation of the book–including its contribution and relation to existing literature and trends in the field, its strengths and weaknesses, and its unique qualities (if any).
  • A brief description of the appropriate audience for the book.

Please forward all book review communication and submissions to Paul Mabrey at mabreype@jmu.edu.

Call and timeline for November book review manuscripts:

The Communication Center Journal is seeking potential contributions for our book review section. Book reviews and scholarly reviews range 750-1,000 words and usually include the following:

  • A brief description of the book’s contents.
  • A scholarly evaluation of the book–including its contribution and relation to existing literature and trends in the field, its strengths and weaknesses, and its unique qualities (if any).
  • A brief description of the appropriate audience for the book.

We are currently seeking reviews for the following books, but also welcome suggestions that contribute to communication center, peer education, or public speaking scholarship. Please contact Paul Mabrey (mabreype@jmu.edu) for all review communication and submissions. To be considered for the 2017 volume of CCJ, please indicate interest by May 31, 2017. Interest will be confirmed by June 12, 2017 and your manuscript should be submitted by September 1, 2017. The 2017 volume will be published by the National Communication Association national conference, November 2017.

Agee, K., & Hodges, R. (2012). Handbook for training peer tutors and mentors. USA: CRLA.

Alley, M. (2003). The Craft of Scientific Presentations: Critical Steps to Succeed and Critical Errors to Avoid. New York, NY: Springer.

Atkins-Sayre, W. & Yook, E.L. (2015). Communicating Advice: Peer Tutoring and Communication Practice. New York, NY: Peter Lang.

Duarte, N. (2012). HBR guide to persuasive presentations. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press.

Turner, K. J., & Sheckels, T. F. (2015). Communication centers: A theory-based guide to training and management. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Yook, E. L., & Atkins-Sayre, W. (2012). Communication centers and oral communication programs in higher education: Advantages, challenges, and new directions. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Call for Papers
Communication Center Journal (CCJ)

Beginning in 2016, the Communication Center Journal (CCJ) will continue to welcome submissions on a rolling cycle for consideration and review. The journal will also welcome submissions for special topical sections of the journal, which will offer a deeper look at broad-based themes and trends.

November 2017 Special Section of CCJ

Theme: Technologies, Media, and Tools of Communication Centers

The November 2017 special section of CCJ invites authors to consider the many technologies and tools in use within their communication centers. Communication centers of a variety of shapes, sizes, and contexts rely on technologies, media, and tools everyday that support their feedback to students, collaboration with student staff members, and enhance research and data collection. These resources, however, are becoming more complex, complicated, and political.

Authors might consider best practices implemented or in process in their centers along with challenges or opportunities involved with engaging technologies, media, and tools in their day-to-day and ongoing work.

Framing questions can include but are not limited to:

  • What do you envision communication center technologies, media, and tools looking like in the next five, ten, or fifteen years?
  • What is the best way to utilize these resources to solve problems in our centers?
    How might instructors/centers collaborate with libraries/librarians to support students in harnessing/evaluating technologies, media, and tools to enhance teaching and learning?
  • What best practices for communication centers will continue to be best practices?
  • What best practices might emerge to best support student communicators in basic courses and beyond?
  • If busy students are reluctant to come to communication centers, how might the communication center go to students?
  • How might communication centers incorporate creativity and creative approaches in their plans and programming that involve innovative uses of mediated or technological tools?
  • How might we use communication center research to inform our decision about choices in technology, media, and tools?

This special section encourages practical, specific solutions as well as data-driven research.

Deadlines
March 15, 2017: 500-word proposals due
April 15, 2017: Authors notified of review results
July 15, 2017: Full articles returned to editor
August 15, 2017: Article revisions sent to authors
November 16, 2017: CCJ issue released at NCA conference

Submissions can be emailed to commcenterj@gmail.com.
Questions can be emailed to Dr. Russell Carpenter, CCJ Editor-in-Chief, at russell.carpenter@eku.edu.